Logos come and go. But a brand, a brand that is loved and cared for, is meant to last. Creating a brand is not only a creative exercise. It’s also an exercise of visualization. 


When a new project begins, it’s hard to know exactly where the journey will lead you. This happens to everyone who decides to embark on an entrepreneurial journey. 
For some, it’s easy to have a sense of direction and to navigate the waters of uncertainty with confidence. For others, it’s much more complicated than that and external validation can play a huge role for them.

Regardless of what side of the spectrum you might be on, one of the first steps entrepreneurs take is creating a logo.
Logos give us a sense of identity, something to rally behind and use as our banner when subjecting your project to public scrutiny for the first time, so it’s normal for us to resort to it.


When it comes to creating anything, I always involve paper and lots of notes.
I like to keep track of my creative process and ideas for future projects.



Although this would seem to be the most obvious approach, the fact of the matter is, that before we can go anywhere near a blank page, it’s important to figure out a couple of things:

1.- Why are you starting this project?
2.- Do you have a vision for the project’s future? And if so, describe it briefly.

It’s useful to write your answers in order to organize your ideas and have greater clarity. This isn’t by any means, unchangeable. The passing of time will most likely change your initial expectations. 

Your vision is probably the most revealing part of this exercise, as it will help you take the first steps into your project. 
It’s ok if these questions turn out to have an “I don’t know” for an answer, this will tell us that maybe our project needs a bit more time before we commit to a pretty icon.


More important than a logo, are your goals and dreams for the future.
What kind of content creator or esports professional do you want to be?



I don’t believe a logo can make you or break you as this statement is too simplistic and ignores a lot of factors related to a project’s success. But it is an element of great importance in the process of building a brand.

Let’s take the example of Team Liquid. If there’s a team that has created  longevity for their brand, it’s this top tier esports organization. 
From its early beginning, Team Liquid’s logo hasn’t actually changed much. But the strength of its brand has grown throughout the years.
From mere observation we can infer that Team Liquid has great clarity of what their values are. This is something that permiates their branding (web design, apparel) but also their choice of players and esports professionals. 

Could you imagine some of their most iconic players like TLO, sporting any other jersey? Probably not. The return of Taeja to StarCraft happened under his former team’s banner. 
When you see a Team Liquid jersey on a Team Liquid player, a lot of things come to mind. Victory, honor, commitment, work ethic. The elegant lines, the bold color blocking paired with a sober color palette. This is not an accident, these are deliberate choices. And said choices seem deliberate to the spectator because of that clarity of ideas. 

This is what we want to communicate from the very beginning. It doesn’t matter if Day 1 is just one or two nerds with a dream. Having a clear sense of identity from the get go will naturally influence your decision making and take you to make better decisions.

Once our vision is clearly stated, individually or as a collective, it’s easier to brainstorm what your logo will look like.

There are many factors to consider beyond aesthetic. Things like personality and character are often overlooked and this is something that well developed brands know very well from the get go. 
It’s useful to think in terms of adjectives when trying to define what you want your brand to be.

But Grizzly, what if I’m the brand?

In the case of branding for individuals as opposed to organizations, the approach is a little different. When the brand is conceptually linked to an individual, the inspiration will be drawn from his/her personality traits. Careful, though. There’s a difference between who we are and who we wish we were. Our goal here is to make of this project something sustainable in the long run. Being true to one’s identity helps achieve this goal. You brand should reflect you as honestly as possible. 

Ready to get started?

In the next post, we’ll discuss the process of creating the right logo for your brand.



Support us on Patreon and get exclusive perks like monthly branding consultations!